Compton Down

Purely the result of driving towards the sun and then going for a walk when I found it. Right over in the far west of Sussex, I took a turn up a lane and thought to myself “That field looks very lovely” and then I saw there was a footpath sign, so I stopped the car and followed it. I was richly rewarded.

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Ashdown Forest

Ashdown Forest is the largest area of open access land in the South East. A former royal hunting preserve, it is more open heathland than it is wooded. Because it’s so big, it’s a great place to go and wander and explore without restrictions. I parked in the parking area opposite Wren’s Warren and went for an adventure that involved crawling through tunnels beneath the gorse and a particularly enjoyable fight through the undergrowth to follow a stream towards the end. The photo of the fly agaric is out of focus, I realise, but I’ve included it because they’re by far the best-looking of the toadstools.

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Black Down

Just a few from Black Down on the 14th of September 2018. Sussex’s highest point is up on the Greensand Ridge, right up on the border with Surrey, near Haslemere. Not only is it very beautiful, but it offers one of the largest areas of open access land in Sussex after Ashdown Forest and the views are spectacular.

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Brede High Wood

Brede High Wood is one of those places I’ve been driving past for years, always thinking “I should stop and have a look one day” and, eventually, on the 13th of September 2018: that day came. An almost magically beautiful woodland owned by the Woodland Trust a patchwork of ancient areas, old coppice, plantations and the occasional open glade, I was entranced by mysterious fungi, wild hops, portentous arches and mile after mile of beautiful, stately beech. Very glad I finally decided to stop and look around.

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